Voters want a kinder, gentler America

The public wants specifics about what programs and agendas candidates propose. Meanwhile, there are politicians who have chosen instead to simply attack, vilify and demean their opponents while doing very little to promote their plans if elected.

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Richard Irvin press conference

Republican gubernatorial primary candidate Richard Irvin held a press conference on May 9 in Aurora.

Rich Hein/Sun-Times

We have been subjected to the ads for Richard Irvin since the beginning of this year, and a distinct pattern seems to be emerging — the GOP gubernatorial hopeful has borrowed heavily from the Trump playbook.

That is, to come across as belligerent, angry and condescending.

This seemed to have been the tone of his recent news conference. With all that has transpired in the last few years, it would appear that more voters than ever have been awakened as to what is going on around them. People are looking for specifics about what programs and agendas candidates propose.

Meanwhile, there are politicians who have chosen instead to simply attack, vilify and demean their opponents while doing very little to promote their plans if elected.

These tactics may have worked for Trump in 2015, but people are tired of this mud-slinging, empty, angry rhetoric. We should treat people with dignity and work together to bring to reality the privileges and freedoms proposed in our founding documents.

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Anger and extremism never win in the long run. We need a kinder, gentler America, and we have no room for politicians who fail to realize that.

Dan Pupo, Orland Park

On Chicago police corruption

I had to laugh when I read the comments on research done by Northwestern University on Chicago police corruption. What everyone sitting in their climate-controlled offices fails to realize is, all officers carry loaded guns.

As a lieutenant working in the 25th District, there was a corrupt crew of 17 officers who committed armed robberies of Polish and Hispanic immigrants. The CPD Internal Affairs Division investigation failed because a chief was tipping off an officer.

After that, I began taking disciplinary action against these officers for minor infractions, like not staying on their beats. This was because they committed their robberies on other beats and districts. That caused my personal car to be damaged a dozen times; three times my windows were shot out while parked in front of my house. Someone started a rumor about me that almost got me killed.

I later learned that a district commander and at least one captain were being given part of the corrupt proceeds. This also occurred in another police district. District commanders and captains are promoted because of their clout. Their promotions must be approved by City Hall. You have to be crazy to go up against any of them. You could lose your job — or life.

Another district was notorious for damaging supervisors’ personal vehicles. Some sergeants drove almost to work and parked in a rented garage. They finished their commute on a CTA bus.

You can criticize all you want. But unless you have been in the trenches, please sit down and be quiet.

Lt. Michael C. Flynn (retired), Chicago Police

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