Rapper G Herbo pleads guilty to using stolen credit cards to pay for private jets, luxury cars, stay at Jamaican villa

G Herbo, whose real name is Herbert Wright III, signed a plea deal Wednesday in federal court in Boston, admitting wire fraud and lying to federal agents.

SHARE Rapper G Herbo pleads guilty to using stolen credit cards to pay for private jets, luxury cars, stay at Jamaican villa
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G Herbo speaks during the BET Awards 2023 at Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles.

Paras Griffin, Getty

Chicago rap star G Herbo has agreed to plead guilty to federal charges that accused him of using information from stolen credit cards to pay for private jets, expensive meals, luxury cars and a stay at a Jamaican villa.

G Herbo, whose real name is Herbert Wright III, signed the agreement Wednesday in the U.S. District Court in Boston, pleading guilty to one count of wire fraud and one count of lying to federal agents.

Under the deal, which still must be approved by a judge, Wright faces as many as 20 years in prison, though the sentence could be a lot less. A hearing in the case is scheduled for later this month.

An indictment handed down in late 2020 accused Wright and five others of obtaining stolen credit card information from “dark web sites” and other places. They also used fake IDs, driver’s licenses and e-mail accounts in the names of aliases and real businesses to defraud people and companies, the indictment stated.

In one instance, Antonio Strong, identifying himself as Wright’s manager, contacted a pet company around Nov. 29, 2017, to order two designer puppies for Wright with a stolen credit card, the indictment stated.

The same stolen credit card was used to pay for a car service to deliver the puppies to Chicago, according to the indictment.

In another case, Wright allegedly sent a direct message to Strong over Instagram around July 7, 2019, requesting a reservation for a private villa in Jamaica, the indictment stated. Strong allegedly made the reservation using stolen payment information, and Wright allegedly stayed at the villa with his associates from July 7 to July 11.

The indictment outlined several other alleged fraudulent payments, including the rental of a Maybach S600 and Bentley CGTC on March 6, 2017.

Herbo, a South Side native, grew into something of a hometown hero as a teenager in the early 2010s, helping lead Chicago’s drill music to international prominence alongside fellow rappers and collaborators Chief Keef and Lil Durk. His music has been lauded for its no-frills, penetrative approach to the violent realities he faced growing up in the city, and, in more recent years, the toll that they took on his mental health.

While Wright has scored gold and platinum plaques and emerged as a local philanthropist, his rise to fame continues to be hampered by legal issues.

Earlier this month, he was found with a loaded handgun during a traffic stop in the River North neighborhood, according to police records.

Wright was charged with a misdemeanor count of unlawful use of a weapon after prosecutors denied felony charges, according to an arrest report. He didn’t face additional counts related to the nearly 300 grams of cannabis that was allegedly recovered during the stop in the first block of East Ontario.

Cook County court records show he has been charged in a series of criminal cases since 2014, most of them involving drug and gun charges that have been dropped. Most recently, he pleaded guilty in 2019 to a misdemeanor gun charge and was sentenced to two years of probation.

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