Cook County juvenile detention center reports first COVID-19 cases in its general population

Five detainees living in the same general population cell tested positive for the coronavirus this week, authorities say.

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One court employee and one resident at the Juvenile Temporary Detention Center tested positive for COVID-19, officials announced Jan. 8.

There are now 14 cases of COVID-19 in detainees at the Cook County Juvenile Detention Center, officials said May 22, 2020.

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The first cases of COVID-19 have been detected in the general population of the Cook County’s Juvenile Temporary Detention Center, officials said Friday.

Five detainees living in the same general population cell tested positive for COVID-19 this week, Office of the Chief Judge spokesman Pat Milhizer said in a statement. Five others in the cell tested negative, he said.

Three others at the center tested positive for the coronavirus, raising the total to 14 cases in detainees at the facility, Milhizer said. So far, 21 employees at the center have tested positive for COVID-19.

The detention center places all residents who tests positive in medical isolation for 14 days in the medical unit, per CDC guidelines, Milhizer said. A total of 381 tests have been administered to detention center employees, and 284 tests have been administered to residents.

There are now 38 employees of the Office of the Chief Judge who have tested positive, Milhizer said.

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