Teen charged with making ‘swatting’ calls to police near Grayslake

After the third call, the sheriff’s office was able to pinpoint the exact address of the caller, which was different from the initially reported apartment.

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A 16-year-old boy was charged Jan. 8, 2020, with making fake 911 calls.

Sun-Times file photo

A 16-year-old boy is charged with making 911 calls to report a fake crime-in-progress— known as “swatting” —near north suburban Grayslake.

The teen allegedly called 911 about 2:20 p.m. Wednesday and hung up the phone, the Lake County sheriff’s office said in a statement.

Officers responded to the 33600 block of North Royal Oak Lake in unincorporated Grayslake but couldn’t find anyone in need, the sheriff’s office said.

Two hours later, another 911 call was placed by someone claiming to be held against their will, the sheriff’s office said. The person said they were injured and saw a gun. The caller hung up and shut off the phone after providing an apartment number. Deputies responded but could find anyone in distress.

About 5:45 p.m., another 911 call was placed by someone saying they were about to be shot, the sheriff’s office said.

This time, the sheriff’s office was able to pinpoint the exact address of the caller, which was different from the initially reported apartment, the sheriff’s office said.

Deputies responded to that apartment and found a 16-year-old boy, who allegedly admitted to making the prank calls to 911, the sheriff’s office said. He was arrested and charged in juvenile court on two felony counts of false reporting to 911.

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