‘Presumed Innocent’ goes to court again in eight-part Apple TV+ series

TV’s legal specialist David E. Kelley tackles a new adaptation of Scott Turow’s classic novel about a Chicago prosecutor accused of murder.

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Prosecutor Rusty Sabich (Harrison Ford, right) consults with his boss (Brian Dennehy) in the 1990 film adaptation of “Presumed Innocent.”

Warner Bros.

The complex Chicago prosecutor from “Presumed Innocent” is headed for a retrial.

Apple TV+ on Thursday announced it has ordered an eight-episode series based on the blockbuster 1987 novel by lawyer Scott Turow. The series will revisit the case of Rusty Sabich, a prosecutor suspected of killing his colleague and former lover.

Earlier, Harrison Ford portrayed Sabich in a hit 1990 film. No casting has been announced for the new project.

Running the show will be executive producer David E. Kelley, the accomplished writer who has tackled courtroom issues on such TV favorites as “Ally McBeal,” “Boston Legal” and “Big Little Lies.” The Apple TV+ announcement said Kelley is reimagining the story to explore “obsession, sex, politics, and the power and limits of love, as the accused fights to hold his family and marriage together.”

Among the other executive producers will be J.J. Abrams, the A-list director whose credits include ABC’s “Lost” and the most recent “Star Wars” trilogy.

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