Medina Spirit will get extra testing at Preakness

Medina Spirit and two other horses trained by Bob Baffert will be under extra scrutiny in the days leading up to the second jewel of the Triple Crown.

SHARE Medina Spirit will get extra testing at Preakness
Kentucky Derby winner Medina Spirit is walked to be groomed after a morning exercise at Pimlico Race Course ahead of the Preakness Stakes.

Kentucky Derby winner Medina Spirit is walked to be groomed after a morning exercise at Pimlico Race Course ahead of the Preakness Stakes.

Julio Cortez/AP

BALTIMORE — Preakness officials said Tuesday they are allowing Kentucky Derby winner Medina Spirit to enter Saturday’s race subject to additional testing and monitoring.

Medina Spirit and two other horses trained by Bob Baffert will be under extra scrutiny in the days leading up to the second jewel of the Triple Crown. The Maryland Racing Commission and Baffert have agreed to the conditions for Medina Spirit, fellow Preakness runner Concert Tour and Beautiful Gift, who is expected to run in the Black-Eyed Susan Stakes on Friday.

Medina Spirit drew the No. 3 post in a field of 10 horses as the 9-5 morning-line favorite. Concert Tour drew the outside 10th post and is the second choice in the wagering at 5-2.

Baffert earlier Tuesday said it was brought to his attention that a veterinarian treated Medina Spirit with an antifungal medication to treat dermatitis that includes the steroid betamethasone. Medina Spirit failed a Kentucky Derby postrace drug test due to the presence of betamethasone.

Maryland Racing’s chief veterinary officer, Dr. Dionne Benson, said at the draw that tests on the three Baffert horses are expected back Friday. This is an additional layer of blood testing added to the usual postrace tests.

The Latest
Getz seems to be focused on further strengthening the minor-league system as the Sox continue their rebuild.
Samuel Cundari, 30, is charged with making threatening posts on X directed at the children of two state lawmakers, gun control groups and the Illinois attorney general’s office. He’s also accused of posting about a potential bomb at a Springfield LGBTQ festival.
The gambler, known industrywide as KrackMan or Krack, wrote: ‘‘I live in the supposed sports-betting capital of the world . . . but have to go to Florida to make bets.’’
Leaders including state Sen. Dick Durbin applauded the move as a path toward sustainability as weather threats and climate change become more common throughout Illinois.