Authorities release age progression photo of missing Aurora boy

SHARE Authorities release age progression photo of missing Aurora boy

The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children has released an age progression photo of what a boy who disappeared from Aurora four years ago might look like today.

Timmothy Pitzen went missing at the age of 6 in May 2011 after a trip with his mother, according to a statement from the NCMEC. He was last seen at a water park in Wisconsin Dells.

Pitzen’s mother, Amy Fry-Pitzen, was found dead of an apparent suicide in a motel room in Rockford. Timmothy has not been seen since.

Timmothy, who would now be 10, was described as a 4-foot-2, 70-pound boy with brown hair and brown eyes when we went missing. He went by the nicknames Tim and Timmy.

The lead investigator in the case, Detective Lee Catavu of the Aurora Police Department, says he’s still confident someone will call in with the information to solve the disappearance.

“NCMEC forensic artists do amazing work and their images have helped bring home hundreds of other children. . . . This important tool may hold the key to bringing Timmothy home,” Catavu said in the statement.

The agency released a similar age-progression photo of Timmothy last year. That photo yielded at least one tip from a woman who said she’d seen the boy, the Chicago Sun-Times reported at the time.

Anyone with information should call Aurora police at (630) 256-5500, or the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at (800) 843-5678.

Timmothy Pitzen | National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Timmothy Pitzen | National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

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