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Todd Frazier denied in Home Run Derby final

White Sox third baseman Todd Frazier hits during the MLB baseball All-Star Home Run Derby, Monday, July 11, 2016, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

SAN DIEGO — White Sox third baseman Todd Frazier advanced to the finals of the Home Run Derby for the third consecutive year but was denied in his bid to repeat as champion Monday at Petco Park.

On the eve of the Tuesday’s All-Star Game, Giancarlo Stanton of the Miami Marlins stole the show with 20 homers in the final round to finish with a record 61. Frazier, batting last, hit 13 in the last round. Frazier got off to a slow start in the final with three homers in the first minute, then strung together four after a timeout.

“It was impressive,’’ Frazier said. “I said it would be an epic home run battle and it stepped up to the name.

“I thought I had a chance when I needed 20, but he deserved it. He put on a great show. I hope everybody enjoyed it.’’

Stanton hit one shot estimated at 497 feet. Like Frazier, the three-time All-Star is not playing in Tuesday’s Midsummer Classic. Two of Stanton’s blasts hit the third level of the Western Metal Supply Co. Building brick warehouse in the left-field corner. Two landed near the left field scoreboard.

“Check the bat,’’ Frazier said in jest, smiling. “There was something going on there. He hit some moon shots.’’

Frazier defeated Carlos Gonzalez in the first round and Adam Duvall in the second. Frazier hit his 13th with nine seconds left in the first round to edge Gonzalez. With his brother Charlie once again throwing to him and many of their families’ kids on the field and in the clubhouse, Frazier said a good time was had by all, even in defeat.

“When I’m done playing I hope I can look back and say I did everything [in baseball],’’ he said. “I feel fine. I’ll look back on this and see it as a plus.’’

Stanton, who would defend his title in Miami, site of next year’s All-Star Game, said he was motivated to put on a good show.

“For sure,” he said, “being on the west coast and taking the flight out here just for this, you know. I figure it’s a waste if I don’t bring this bad boy home.”

Sale’s tribute to Gwynn

Chris Sale went out of his way at the All-Star press conference to pay tribute to Padres legend Tony Gwynn, a Hall of Famer who played 20 seasons in the majors — for the Padres — through 2003.

Sale said he gave up smokeless tobacco when Gwynn died of salivary gland cancer in June 2014 at age 54.

“He actually made a very big impact in my life. I chewed tobacco from 2007 until the day he passed away,” Sale said. “I remember seeing that, and just being so shocked. He was a larger-than-life person. He was an inspiration to the game for many, many people for a lot of different reasons. But I quit that day, and I haven’t touched it since.

“In a sense, I owe him a huge thank you for not only myself but for my family, and, you know, hopefully I can maybe sway somebody in the right direction as well like he did for me.”

Pinch me

While most players arrived Sunday night, Jose Quintana got here Monday morning with his family because of his late notice – he was added to the AL team on Sunday – but got to the media session nonetheless.

“I feel like I’m in a dream,’’ the Sox left-hander said. “I’m so happy to be here.”

Quintana, never one to talk himself up, said he was deserving. And win-loss record (7-8) aside, he’s probably right, with a 7-8 with a 3.21 ERA and 105 strikeouts over 18 starts. Quintana ranks fifth in the AL in ERA and sixth in innings (117 2/3) and WHIP (1.11). He has been remarkably consistent as a starter with ERAs of 3.51, 3.32 and 3.36 his previous three seasons.Frazier, whose brother Charlie pitched to him as he did last year, leads the American League and is tied for second in the majors with 25 homers. This was his third consecutive derby. Before winning at Cincinnati as a member of the Cincinnati Reds, he advanced to the finals at Target Field in Minneapolis in 2014.

<em>Todd Frazier hugs Mike Trout after hitting during the MLB baseball All-Star Home Run Derby. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)</em>
Todd Frazier hugs Mike Trout after hitting during the MLB baseball All-Star Home Run Derby. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi)

Sale’s tribute to Gwynn

Chris Sale went out of his way at the All-Star press conference to pay tribute to Padres legend Tony Gwynn, a Hall of Famer who played 20 seasons in the majors — for the Padres — through 2003.

Sale said he gave up smokeless tobacco when Gwynn died of salivary gland cancer in June 2014 at age 54.

“He actually made a very big impact in my life. I chewed tobacco from 2007 until the day he passed away,” Sale said. “I remember seeing that, and just being so shocked. He was a larger-than-life person. He was an inspiration to the game for many, many people for a lot of different reasons. But I quit that day, and I haven’t touched it since.

“In a sense, I owe him a huge thank you for not only myself but for my family, and, you know, hopefully I can maybe sway somebody in the right direction as well like he did for me.”

Pinch me

While most players arrived Sunday night, Jose Quintana got here Monday morning with his family because of his late notice – he was added to the AL team on Sunday – but got to the media session nonetheless.

“I feel like I’m in a dream,’’ the Sox left-hander said. “I’m so happy to be here.”

Quintana, never one to talk himself up, said he was deserving. And win-loss record (7-8) aside, he’s probably right, with a 7-8 with a 3.21 ERA and 105 strikeouts over 18 starts. Quintana ranks fifth in the AL in ERA and sixth in innings (117 2/3) and WHIP (1.11). He has been remarkably consistent as a starter with ERAs of 3.51, 3.32 and 3.36 his previous three seasons.