toyota_logo_e1541106641309.jpg

Toyota is recalling just over 1 million vehicles worldwide because the air bags could inflate without a crash or fail to work if there is one. Toyota said on Nov. 1, 2018 that an electrical short can damage circuits. | AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar

Toyota recalls over 1M vehicles to fix air bag problem

SHARE Toyota recalls over 1M vehicles to fix air bag problem
SHARE Toyota recalls over 1M vehicles to fix air bag problem

DETROIT — Toyota is recalling just over 1 million vehicles worldwide because the air bags could inflate without a crash or fail to work if there is one.

The recall covers about 17,000 Scion xA vehicles in the U.S. from 2004 through 2006. Also affected in Japan, Europe and elsewhere are the Isis, Avensis, Avensis Wagon, Allex, ist, Wish, Corolla, Corolla Spacio, Corollo Verso, Corolla Fielder, Corolla Runx, and Sienta. The vehicles were built from July 2002 to June 2015.

Toyota said Thursday an electrical short can damage circuits. That could deactivate the air bags and seat belt pretensioners or cause those systems to deploy inadvertently.

Dealers will replace the air bag control unit. Owners will be notified in December.

Toyota wouldn’t say if the problem has caused any crashes or injuries.

RELATED: Toyota recalls 2.4 million hybrids due to stalling problems

The Latest
Jordan Jackson, 22, faces three counts of aggravated assault of a peace officer, one count of possession of a firearm with a defaced serial number and two counts of unlawful use of a weapon, Chicago police said.
Mr. Wiley started as a copy clerk in 1952, working from midnight to 8 a.m., and attending classes at Northwestern University during the day.
A man was wounded by a security guard during a shootout at Millennium Park.
Ms. Osborne earned her bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University and a master’s degree from Northwestern University. She was a founding member of the Chicago chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists.
David Smith, complete streets manager at the Chicago Department of Transportation, sat down for an interview recently to answer cyclists’ most pressing questions.