What keeps us going during these tough times and offers hope? Chicagoans’ heartfelt answers.

Good food. Beating cancer. Time with family. Nature walks. Lots of Bloody Marys. Pets. Prayer. Unsung people working to make us all safer. Hope that ‘normal’ will soon return.

SHARE What keeps us going during these tough times and offers hope? Chicagoans’ heartfelt answers.
Dr. Marina Del Rios, from University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System, receives Chicago’s first COVID-19 vaccination from Dr. Nikhila Juvvadi on Dec. 15, 2020, at Loretto Hospital in Austin.

Science and the prospect of getting vaccinated against COVID-19, as Dr. Marina Del Rios from the University of Illinois Hospital was on Tuesday, offer many people hope these days.

Livestream

We asked Chicagoans: What’s keeping you going during this difficult time, and what’s giving you hope? Some answers have been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

“What’s keeping me going is my family, friends and co-workers. What’s giving me hope is God and the goodness of people who believe in unity in this country.” — Derrick Grady Sr.

“I work in an assisted-living facility, so spending time with the residents and my family keeps me going.” — Karen Holman

“Bloody Marys. Lots and lots of Bloody Marys... I’ve become an expert at making Bloody Marys.” — Antonio Cruz

Learning how to make a great Bloody Mary has been a good skill to pick up during the pandemic, according to Antonio Cruz.

Learning how to make a great Bloody Mary has been a good skill to pick up during the pandemic, according to Antonio Cruz.

Adobe

“The people I live with. Walking, breathing in fresh, outdoor air. Reading. And thanking God for our safety and health.” — Jo Ann Fields

“Small, periodic, distanced get-togethers with family. Exercising to audiobooks. Zoom groups on the craft of writing. Brewing cappuccinos at home. Making soup, Zoom sitting meditation sessions. And, of course, Netflix.” — Judy Panko Reis

“My little dog, my family and hope for a better life in 2021.” — Dorothey Rutherford

Walking every day, usually with a friend, keeps me going. What gives me hope is that I am healthy and looking forward to being with my children and grandkids in 2021.” — Tina Rotter

“I cannot recommend the Adult Swim series ‘Joe Pera Talks With You’ highly enough for these troubled times.” — Daniel James

Daniel James finds comfort in “Joe Pera Talks With You,” an Adult Swim TV series in which a Pera (above), a teacher in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, plays a fictionalized version of himself who talks directly to the audience about the mundane things that are key parts of life. Like Sunday breakfast and sleeping.

Daniel James finds comfort in “Joe Pera Talks With You,” an Adult Swim TV series in which a Pera (above), a teacher in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, plays a fictionalized version of himself who talks directly to the audience about the mundane things that are key parts of life. Like Sunday breakfast and sleeping.

Getty Images

“Encouraging thoughts like this favorite Bible verse help me cope day by day: ‘Do not be afraid, for I am with you. Do not be anxious, for I am your God. I will fortify you, yes, I will help you. I will hold on to you with my right hand of righteousness.’ Isaiah 41:10.” — Wanda Jackson

“Family, nature walks and my cat.” — Christy Nickolas

“Was the Bears. I looked forward to them all summer long. Now, that’s kinda diminished, but I love football in general. It’s what gets me through the atrocious fall and early winter months.” — Brice Notardonato Ellett

Mitch Trubisky (10), Cordarrelle Patterson (84) and the rest of the Bears gave Brice Notardonato Ellett something to look forward to all summer. These days, though, not so much.

Mitch Trubisky (10), Cordarrelle Patterson (84) and the rest of the Bears gave Brice Notardonato Ellett something to look forward to all summer. These days, though, not so much.

AP

“My husband and kids. Nature and walks outside. Great books and movies/TV. Supporting local businesses and restaurants. Political activism and being a voice for change.” — Christina Brearley Nagrant

“I am a teacher. My hope lies in the fact that several vaccine candidates are becoming available and perhaps someday soon school will return to normal. I did not go into education to stare at a computer screen. This year has been bereft of the best parts of teaching: the human interactions and the chance to build relationships with students. I truly hope the future represents a return to normalcy.” — Jason Briski

“I have a 7-year-old to look after. It’s all about her.” — René Verastegui

“My family and friends are the best. And science gives me hope.” — Frank Zarate

“My faith in Jesus Christ, my family and friends — and my pets, who love me regardless of how I feel.” — Sherronda Bohanon

“Family, movie apps, gaming, music, foods, thinking ahead, giving wisdom to others.” — Damien Guyton

“Knowing that nothing is permanent keeps me going and gives me hope.” — Mark Ruda

“Staying with some family.” — Mara Magdich

“Work, money — and a little bit of wine.” — Armando David Latorre

“Beer, love, movies and food.” — Leo Dukes

“Beating cancer. Living with my family is my hope.” — Olivia Castellano

“Good people who never make the headlines but are working day and night to keep us healthy: doctors, scientists, truck drivers, postal and delivery employees, volunteers, religious leaders, moms and dads, so many that we will never know. They keep me going.” — Michael R. Butz

“Prayer.” — Maryellen Joyce

“The fact that life always gets better. Always.” — Ashley Marie

The Latest
Jeffrey Montes De Oca, 31, was arrested Wednesday by the Great Lakes Regional Fugitive Task Force in Orland Park, according to police.
With most babies, neonatal jaundice will go away on its own. It’s just a matter of waiting for the infant’s liver to catch up to the amount of bilirubin that needs to be removed.
At the core of the dance company is the belief that “dance is for everyone.”
Bee pollen commonly is consumed for nutrition and traditionally has been used in Chinese medicine and taken for various ailments.
Richard Banks, 22, and Christian Anderson, 16, both of Chicago, are charged with first-degree murder in the May 14 shooting death of Jeremiah Ellis.