More details (and photos) of the ‘Dancing’ injury

SHARE More details (and photos) of the ‘Dancing’ injury
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As reported last night, Cristian de la Fuente suffered an injury while performing the samba with his partner Cheryl Burke on Monday’s “Dancing With The Stars” on ABC.

“In the very beginning of the dance, I fell back into his arms and I heard something crack,” Burke told TV Guide, who was in tears after the show. “I thought it was my dress making that sound. I didn’t think it was anything else.”

More photos…

“I was like, ‘Oh my god, what’s happening?'” Burke recalls. “I didn’t know what was going on. So I just went ahead and finished the routine. I fell at the end. Whatever. You gotta keep going. It’s a live show, you know?”

De la Fuente began struggling near the end of the samba. He gripped his arm and seemingly tried to shake off the pain. But it finally gave away when he couldn’t hold onto Burke anymore, and she fell to the floor:

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EMTs at the studio said De la Fuente pulled a muscle, but the Chilean film and television star was taken to a hospital after the show.

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He was undergoing more tests this morning, and his future plans on the show will be addressed tonight.

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