At G20, Obama won’t reveal course if Congress rejects Syria strikes

SHARE At G20, Obama won’t reveal course if Congress rejects Syria strikes
SHARE At G20, Obama won’t reveal course if Congress rejects Syria strikes

President Obama on Friday acknowledged he faces an uphill battle in pushing for air strikes in Syria but wouldn’t tip his hand on what course he would take if Congress rebuffs his call for action.

“It would be a mistake for me to jump the gun and speculate because right now I’m working to get as much support as possible out of Congress,” he said during a press conference at the G-20 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Obama also revealed he held a surprise meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, who remained a chief opponent of U.S. military action. Obama and chief administration officials have been lobbying Congress to back military strike on Syria in retaliation for the Assad regime’s Aug. 21 gassing of more than 1,400 of its own people — including more than 400 children.

“My goal is to maintain the international norm on … chemical weapons,” Obama said.

“I want that enforcement to be real,” the president said. “Delivering chemical weapons against children is not something we do. We certainly don’t do it against kids. And we got to stand up for that principle.”

Obama plans to deliver a Tuesday night speech from the White House to continue to make his case for air strikes in Syria.

The Latest
The fatal attack occurred in Homan Square.
One of the wounded, a 32-year-old man, was driving down the street when he was struck by gunfire, police said.
The 34-year-old was crossing the street just before 8:30 p.m. in the 2900 block of West Columbus Avenue when she was struck by a black SUV.
“That’s where you build fandom, grow revenue, and that’s where all the players will benefit versus adding a roster spot here and there.”