Chicago man charged with Naperville health club stabbing

Allen G. White, 65, is accused of stabbing a man in the chest with a screwdriver June 5 in a locker room of a Naperville health club.

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A Chicago man has been charged with attempted murder for a stabbing last month at a Naperville health club.

Allen G. White, 65, is accused of stabbing a man in the chest with a screwdriver around 11:10 a.m. June 5 in a locker room of a fitness club in the 3000 block of South Route 59. 

Naperville police said the victim had confronted White about searching through his personal belongings before the attack. The man was transported to a hospital with critical injuries, but has since been released and “is expected to make a full recovery,” police said.

White fled the health club before police arrived. He was arrested Saturday and remains jailed in Will County, police said.

He is charged with one count each of attempted murder, armed robbery, burglary and possession of burglary tools. He also is charged with three counts of aggravated battery and two counts of unlawful possession of a weapon by a felon.

A court hearing has not been scheduled.

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