Man robs second Far South Side bank in two weeks

SHARE Man robs second Far South Side bank in two weeks
SHARE Man robs second Far South Side bank in two weeks

Authorities are searching for a man who has robbed two Morgan Park neighborhood banks on the Far South Side in the last two weeks.

Surveillance photo of a man suspected in two recent bank robberies in the Morgan Park neighborhood. / photo from the FBI

Surveillance photo of a man suspected in two recent bank robberies in the Morgan Park neighborhood. / photo from the FBI

The most recent robbery happened Thursday afternoon at a Fifth Third Bank branch at 11850 S. Marshfield, according to the FBI.

The man walked into the bank about 3:30 p.m. and implied he had a weapon while handing the teller a note demanding money, police said. He then ran away with an undisclosed amount of cash.

The same man is suspected of robbing a U.S. Bank branch at 11150 S. Western on Nov. 8, according to the FBI.

About 10:40 a.m., a man walked into the bank and handed a note to the teller demanding money, police said. He then took an unknown amount of cash and ran out of the bank.

No weapon was shown during either robbery and no one was hurt, authorities said.

The suspect is described as a black man, between 40 and 50 years old, 5-foot-8 to 5-foot-10, with brown eyes, facial hair and marks on his face, according to the FBI. He has been seen wearing a black coat to his knees.

Anyone with information about the suspect or the robberies is asked to call the FBI Chicago office at (312) 421-6700.

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