No cameras in courtroom for trial of Chicago Police Cmdr. Glenn Evans: judge

SHARE No cameras in courtroom for trial of Chicago Police Cmdr. Glenn Evans: judge
SHARE No cameras in courtroom for trial of Chicago Police Cmdr. Glenn Evans: judge

A Cook County judge Wednesday said she will not allow cameras in the courtroom for the upcoming trial of Chicago Police Cmdr. Glenn Evans but said the media could record audio during the testimony.

At least 14 potential witnesses, including Evans, objected to being photographed or recorded by video cameras in the courtroom.

Some of the witnesses have said they work undercover and don’t want their identities revealed.

Evans, 53, and his family have been receiving threats since he was charged with shoving a pistol down a suspect’s throat and holding a Taser to the man’s groin, his attorneys have said.

Although Judge Diane Cannon banned cameras for the trial, she said keeping the media from recording testimony in any form would be an issue.

“Creating a ‘veil of secrecy’ might be more problematic,” she said.

The Chicago Tribune had filed a motion, seeking the use of still and video cameras during Evans’ trial, arguing that the media could take pictures without showing the faces of those who didn’t want to be seen.

Cameras have been allowed at the Leighton Criminal Courthouse as part of a pilot program that started earlier this year. Lawyers can object to the cameras and judges presiding in the specific case ultimately decide whether they will be allowed for the trial.

Evans’ trial date has not been set.

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