Museum of Science and Industry announces first Black woman president/CEO

Chevy Humphrey will replace David Mosena, who is retiring after 23 years.

SHARE Museum of Science and Industry announces first Black woman president/CEO
The Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago named Chevy Humphrey as its incoming president and CEO on Wednesday. Oct. 7, 2020.

The Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago named Chevy Humphrey as its incoming president and CEO on Wednesday.

Arizona Science Center

The Museum of Science and Industry is getting its first Black woman president and CEO.

Chevy Humphrey’s selection was announced Wednesday. She will replace David Mosena, who will retire after 23 years at the end of the year. Humphrey, 15-year president and CEO of Arizona Science Center, will start in January.

“It’s very humbling and I’m overwhelmed,” Humphrey said. “But I’m excited for the opportunity to actually provide science and education to people of all ages, especially kids and teachers.”

Humphrey was picked for her leadership skills, Michelle Collins, chair of MSI’s search committee, was quoted as saying in a museum news release. Humphrey previously held positions at the University of Texas at Austin, University of Houston and The Phoenix Symphony.

Humphrey is also chair of the American Alliance of Museums’ board of directors, one of the largest international associations of museums.

“It’s an exciting appointment for a number of reasons, including her track record and commitment to science education, her international leadership within her field, and deep desire to engage with Chicago’s many diverse communities,” Collins said.

Humphrey said it’s important for her to make sure the museum has a connection to the community. And when she starts next year, she hopes to do a “listening tour” to hear what Chicagoans need and how MSI can fill those gaps.

She added she will have an “open door policy,” where she encourages people to email her their thoughts.

“I really want to get to know Chicago, I want to understand the civic and business leadership, I want to know the educators, students, community,” she said. “I want to know everything.”

The Latest
If only so many weren’t too lazy and incurious — and triggered by discussions of race — to click on an easy-to-find three-year-old story so that they might gain an actual understanding of the context.
At issue are pending increases in health insurance costs for Affordable Care Act plans. Voters will learn just before the November elections that temporarily boosted subsidies will expire in 2023 — unless Congress acts.
One is product shortages, as with the shortage of personal protective equipment early in the pandemic and recently with infant formula. But are we willing to pay higher prices for less reliance on the global supply chain?
The hurried ordinance allowing outdoor amplified entertainment events without oversight is a bad idea.
The woman, 27, was not on the Red Line platform when she was shot, police said.