2nd federal prisoner at Marion dies this week of COVID-19

A second inmate diagnosed with COVID-19 at the federal prison in Marion, Illinois, has died this week

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The inner and outer security fence surrounding the medium security federal prison in Marion, Ill.

Steve Jahnke/AP

MARION, Ill. — A second inmate diagnosed with COVID-19 at the federal prison in Marion, Illinois, has died this week, authorities said.

Taiwan Davis, 39, died Wednesday at a hospital where he was receiving treatment for the disease, the Federal Bureau of Prisons said. Davis tested positive for COVID-19 on July 29, it said.

Davis had “pre-existing medical conditions, which the CDC lists as risk factors for developing more severe COVID-19 disease,” the agency said in a news release. The CDC is the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Davis had been in custody at Marion since December. He was serving a seven-year sentence for distribution of a controlled substance from the Southern District of Illinois.

Davis’ death follows that on Sunday of Earl James, 65. James was diagnosed with COVID-19 on July 22, and was transported to a hospital for increased shortness of breath, coughing and lack of oxygen five days later. He also had pre-existing medical conditions that put him at high risk for developing a more severe COVID-19 disease, the Bureau of Prisons said.

James was serving a 30-year sentence for sexual abuse, aggravated sexual abuse of a minor and abusive sexual contact, and attempted aggravated sexual abuse of a minor, the Southern Illinoisan reported. He was sentenced in Arizona.

Currently, 80 inmates and four employees at Marion have active cases of COVID-19, according to the Bureau of Prisons.

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