Where are leaders to combat Chicago’s violence crisis?

It appears that violence in the city has been accepted as a normal, everyday occurrence, just like new business development and entertainment. This is wrong.

SHARE Where are leaders to combat Chicago’s violence crisis?
Chicago police investigate the scene where one person was killed and four others wounded in a shooting at 48th and Ada streets, May 10, 2022.

Chicago police investigate the scene where one person was killed and four others wounded in a shooting at 48th and Ada streets.

Tyler Pasciak LaRiviere/Sun-Times

As I view the front page of the Sun-Times website, I see more articles about people in the city who have been killed. I also see articles about the proposed new casino, preserving State Street buildings and theatre matters.

It appears that violence in the city has been accepted as a normal, everyday occurrence, just like new business development and entertainment. This is wrong. Some neighborhoods are high-crime zones. Where is Mayor Lori Lightfoot, Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle and Gov. J.B. Pritzker, to address and confront the crime activity? Where are these government leaders to provide leadership in the time of a great crisis?

One option is to bring in the National Guard to these areas to help stabilize them and give the police department assistance. Running a city like Chicago is a huge task, but addressing the safety needs of its residents is just as important as bringing in a new casino or the next great skyscraper.

These government leaders are failing many of the people of Chicago. It is time for them to step up their actions in this regard right now, and not just when they need a vote in the next election.

Howard Herman, Skokie

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Cost savings for ComEd customers

It’s tough right now to be a consumer, with inflation, the Russian invasion of Ukraine and other market forces pushing prices up on everything from groceries to home loans to used cars.We’re especially feeling pain at the pump and in our monthly energy bills.

That’s why we were greatly satisfied to learn about the cost savings ComEd customers are set to receive thanks to a provision in the state’s recently enacted Climate and Equity Jobs Act called the Carbon Mitigation Credit Program.

Climate Jobs Illinois, a labor coalition representing the state’s hundreds of thousands of union working men and women, was the original proponent of the program as part of our support to preserve the state’s carbon-free nuclear plants and to save thousands of union jobs that operate these facilities.

The Carbon Mitigation Credit Program does two things: 1) It ensures the nuclear plants are provided subsidies to meet their annual costs for costs necessary for continued operation, based on an independent audit; and 2) It protects customers against high energy prices like we’re seeing right now. The new law requires the utility to repay customers when wholesale electricity prices rise above the established contract price for any reason during the contract term.

Our support for nuclear subsidies and the Carbon Mitigation Program was not a popular position during the months-long legislative negotiations, but we’re pleased our persistence paid off. Because the program was ultimately included in the final bill, ComEd customers now will save an average $237 on their energy bills over the next year.

That is good policymaking in action.

Pat Devaney, Climate Jobs Illinois / Illinois AFL-CIO

Bikers, stay safe

Regarding Amy Rynell’s column on bike safety, I agree that there should be safe ways for cyclists to ride in the city. And obviously it is a tragedy when anyone is hurt or killed.

This is in no way a disagreement but merely an addition: As an automobile driver in the city, I constantly see bike riders ignoring red lights and stop signs. If you are riding on the street, you should follow the same rules as cars. I.e., do your part to keep yourself safe.

Deborah Donberg, Edgewater

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