How to score $10 tickets to ‘Hamilton’ shows in Chicago

The digital lottery system offers a limited number of tickets so Chicagoans can see the musical about Founding Father Alexander Hamilton without breaking the bank. Here’s how to not throw away your shot at the coveted tickets.

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The national touring production of “Hamilton” arrives Sept. 13 at the James M. Nederlander Theatre.

Joan Marcus 2021

The popular musical “Hamilton” is returning to Chicago in September for the first time since 2020 — and so is a digital lottery system that, the last time around, made getting tickets to the show something of a sport.

The system offers a limited number of tickets at $10 so Chicagoans can have a chance to see the musical about Founding Father Alexander Hamilton without breaking the bank. Here’s what you need to know.

How does the lottery work?

A limited number of tickets will be available for every performance for $10 each.

The discounted tickets will be available in batches, with the lottery opening at 10 a.m on Friday and closing at noon Thursday for tickets to the first week of shows, from Sept. 13 through Sept. 17. Broadway In Chicago said that each week after, the lottery will open at 10 a.m. on Friday and will remain open through noon the next Thursday before the following week’s performances.

Lottery prices are not valid on prior purchases. Winners can’t get refunds or exchanges on discounted tickets, so make sure to carefully select the showtime you want to see.

How much are tickets without the lottery?

Prices range from $42.50 to $232.50. A limited number of $49, day of show rush tickets are also available and can only be purchased at the James M. Nederlander box office on the day of the performance when the box office opens. Limit of two tickets per valid ID.

Can anyone participate in the lottery?

While the lottery is marketed toward local people, anyone who is at least 18 with a valid, nonexpired photo ID can purchase tickets. The ticket holder must have identification that matches the name used to enter. The reselling of discounted tickets will void them.

How exactly can I enter?

Entry into the lottery happens exclusively through the official app for Hamilton, available in the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store. Winners are able to secure up to two tickets at the $10 price point. Only one entry per person; repeated entries will be discarded.

How will I know if I won the chance to buy a discounted ticket?

Both winners and nonwinners will be notified by 4 p.m. on Thursday for the upcoming week’s performances through email and an app notification (so be sure to keep your notifications on). Winners then have two hours to claim and buy their tickets.

Will I receive the tickets digitally?

No. Tickets purchased through the lottery will be available at will call two hours prior to performance start time with a valid photo ID that matches the name used to enter.

Aside from the digital lottery, tickets are on sale now for the upcoming season and are available online or via box office by calling 312- 977-1710.

What can I expect from this run of the show?

Hamilton originally premiered in 2015 in New York and starred the creator and writer Lin-Manuel Miranda. It took more than a year to premiere in Chicago. The current production will be the fifth run at the James M. Nederlander Theatre.

Producers did not make a cast announcement. Making the rounds in the North American tour recently have been New York actors Pierre Jean Gonzalez (“Gotham,” “NCIS”) cast as Hamilton and Deon’te Goodman, who has understudied several roles in the production, as Aaron Burr.

If you go: Hamilton opens Sept. 13 at the Nederlander Theatre, 24 W. Randolph St. It runs through Dec. 30.

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