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Cops: Woman, 74, shoots hubby, calls ambulance, for her, not him

Sharnett Perkins-Parrow | Cook County Sheriff mug shot

After a 74-year-old South Side woman, who uses a walker, shot her husband, she wanted an ambulance, prosecutors alleged.

For herself, not him.

She said she felt sick after shooting someone, prosecutors say.

When police arrested the woman, Sharnett Perkins-Parrow, in connection with killing her husband, she allegedly told them, “Yeah, that’s my gun. It was my daddy’s.”

Investigators found even more incriminating evidence in a basket attached under the seat of Perkins-Parrow’s walker — two more rounds of .38-caliber ammo, Assistant Cook County State’s Attorney Guy Lisuzzo said at the bond hearing for Perkins-Parrow Wednesday.

Perkins-Parrow was not in court because she was getting oxygen at St. Bernard Hospital and Health Care Center.

Judge Adam Bourgeois Jr. ordered her held without bond pending her attendance for an official hearing. But prosecutors still detailed the allegations that led to the death of 68-year-old Booker T. Parrow.

Although the two were married, the couple lived in separate units at the Cambridge Manor apartment buildings, in the 2600 block of South Indiana, Lisuzzo explained.

Perkins-Parrow was seen on surveillance footage going to her husband’s 19th floor studio apartment minutes after he returned home Monday morning, Lisuzzo said.

Perkins-Parrow shot her husband once in the back of his left upper arm and placed a .38-special revolver in his right hand, Lisuzzo said.

She was inside just three minutes.

After the shooting, shortly before 10 a.m., Perkins-Parrow took the elevator down.

But the elevator stopped on the 18th floor because a maintenance man was repairing the door to the garbage chute, Lisuzzo said.

When she saw the repairman, Perkins-Parrow asked him to call 911, telling him she felt ill because she shot someone, Lisuzzo said.

Police and paramedics found Parrow lying face down in front of a couch.

Perkins-Parrow initially told the cops, “We got to struggling and the gun went off,” according to a police report.

But prosecutors said there were no signs of a struggle. Perkins-Parrow had no visible injuries.

The Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office said it was highly unlikely that the gunshot wound was self-inflicted or the result of a struggle over a gun, Lisuzzo said.

The bullet entered through Parrow’s left arm and exited his upper right chest after passing through his lungs, Lisuzzo said.