Four people shot on West Side — fourth mass shooting in area in last three months

A group of people were standing in the street in the 2700 block of West Jackson Boulevard early Saturday when a black truck approached and someone got out and began firing a rifle, police said.

SHARE Four people shot on West Side — fourth mass shooting in area in last three months
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Four people were shot and wounded early Saturday in East Garfield Park — the fourth mass shooting in the area in the last three months.

A group of people were standing in the street in the 2700 block of West Jackson Boulevard around 1:45 a.m. when a black truck approached and someone got out and began firing a rifle, Chicago police said.

A man, 37, was hit in the right shoulder and was taken to Mount Sinai Medical Center in good condition; a man, 40, was grazed in the right hand and taken to Mount Sinai in good condition; a woman, 32, was shot in the back and taken to Mount Sinai in good condition; and a woman, 40, was grazed in the leg and went Norwegian Hospital .

No one was in custody.

At least three other mass shooting have occurred in the West Garfield area since the end of April.

  • On July 1, about a mile and a half away, four people were wounded when a man walking on Springfield Avenue took out a gun and began firing at Monroe Street, police said.
  • On May 29, about 2 1/2 miles away, five people ranging in age from 16 to 33 were on a sidewalk in the 800 block of South Karlov Avenue when there was a fight and an exchange of gunfire, police said. The crowd had gathered near a Lawndale elementary school to mark the death of another teenager who was killed by gunfire two years earlier.
  • On April 27, also about 2 1/2 miles away, four people were standing on a sidewalk in the 4400 block of West Jackson Boulevard when someone fired from a white sedan, police said.

No one was killed in the attacks.

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